Hysterectomy

 

What Is a Hysterectomy?

A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a woman's uterus. Depending on the reason for the surgery, the whole uterus may be removed or just part of it. After a hysterectomy, a woman does not have menstrual periods anymore and cannot become pregnant.

Sometimes a gynecological surgeon may also remove the fallopian tubes and ovaries during the procedure. Removing the ovaries during a hysterectomy causes the onset of menopause.  

Why Have a Hysterectomy?

There are a variety of reasons a woman might have a hysterectomy. These include:          

  • Cancer. If you have cancer of the uterus, ovary, cervix or endometrium (the tissue that lines the uterus), your oncologist may recommend a hysterectomy.
  • Endometriosis. When the endometrium (the uterus’ inner membrane) grows outside the uterus onto ovaries, fallopian tubes or other organs, the condition is called endometriosis. It can result in severe pain during menstrual periods, pain during or after sex, bleeding between periods and other symptoms. Medications and surgical options are typically tried first. But if they don’t work, your gynecologist may advise that you have a hysterectomy.
  • Fibroids. These noncancerous tumors grow in the wall of the uterus. It’s possible for women to have fibroids with minor symptoms and no need for treatment. But for some women, fibroids cause pain or prolonged heavy bleeding. If medications and other procedures don’t work, a hysterectomy may be the best option.
  • Prolapse of the uterus. When the uterus falls down into the vagina, it can result in urinary and bowel problems and pelvic pressure. A hysterectomy can resolve the problem.  

Why Parrish Medical Center

The women’s care team at Parrish Medical Center understands what women need to feel their best. We work with women to make every day a healthy day, focusing on mind, body and spirit. But when something goes wrong, our team of gynecologists, urologists and surgeons are ready.

A minimally invasive hysterectomy (done laproscopically) can shorten recovery and healing time, but each woman and situation is different. Your physician will discuss the best options for the most effective procedure for you.